Sick Leave to Assist with Care for Family

The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) provides workers job-protection and unpaid leave for specified family and medical reasons.

Federal Employees can use sick leave for family care and bereavement; annual up to 12 weeks (480 hours) for a family member with a serious health condition. 

States and cities where you can take paid sick leave to take care for sick family.

Rulings in several US cities provide paid sick leave for employees to take care for sick family.

Paid Family Leave (PFL) is an extension of California's State Disability Insurance (SDI) program and extends 6 weeks of replacement income per year to workers who need to take time off to care for a new child or a seriously ill family member.

The Hawaii Family Leave Law (HFLL) requires employers with at least 100 employees on each working day of 20 or more calendar weeks in the current or preceding calendar year to provide up to four weeks of family leave per calendar year.  Family leave may be unpaid or paid, or a combination of both.

Maine's Family and Medical Leave Policy

Employees working for, private employers with 15 or more employees; all state employers, and local governments with 25 or more employees are entitled to up to 10 weeks family leave in 2 years. Read more on Maine's Family and Medical Leave Policy.

Rhode Island Family and Medical Leave

Employees are entitled to up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave in a year for serious health conditions, birth or adoption of a child, or to care for a family member. Employees are eligible if they have worked for the same company for a year, worked at least 1250 hours the previous year and work in a location with at least 50 employees within a 75 mile radius. Employers are subject to the FMLA if they have at least 50 employees for at least 20 weeks in the current or previous year.

Vermont's Parental and Family Leave Law

Employees are entitled to up to 12 weeks in 12 months for parental or family leave. All employers who employ ten or more persons for an average of at least 30 hours per week per year must offer eligible employees parental leave. Employees who have worked an average of 30 hours per week and have been employed at the company for at least 12 months are eligible for parental leave. Read more on Vermont's Parental and Family Leave Law.

The CFRA provides up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave to bond with a newborn or adopted or foster child, or to care for a parent, spouse, child or own serious health condition. The CFRA covers employers who do business in California and employ 50 or more people. Read more about the CFRA.

The Massachusetts Maternity Leave Act is replaced by the Parental Leave Act (PLA), effective April 7, 2015. The PLA provides eight weeks of unpaid leave for both men and women when giving birth, or for adoption of a child. Read more about the Parental Leave Act.

Oregon Family Leave

Employees who worked at least 25 hours per week in the past 180 days, for an employer with 25 or more employees, are entitled to up to 12 weeks of unpaid family leave per year for birth, adoption or to care for the employee's sick family member. Bereavement leave is 2 weeks of leave. Read more on Oregon's Family Leave Act.

Wisconsin Family and Medical Leave Act

All employers with 50 or more permanent employees must allow employees of either sex up to 6 weeks of unpaid leave in a calendar year for the birth or adoption of a child, up to 2 weeks for the care of a child, spouse, parent, domestic partner, or parent of a domestic partner with a serious health condition and up to 2 weeks for the employee's own serious health condition. Read more on Wisconsin's Family and Medical Leave Act.

If you work for an employer with 75 or more employees you are entitled to up to 16 weeks unpaid leave in 2 years for the birth or adoption of a child, placement of child for foster care, to care for a family member with a serious medical condition, for the serious medical condition of the employee, or to serve as an organ or bone marrow donor. Read more about the Connecticut Family and Medical Leave.

Minnesota Pregnancy and Parental Leave Act, FMLA

Employees working at least half time for 12 consecutive months for an employer with 21 or more employees, are entitled to up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave upon the birth of adoption of their child. Read more on Minnesota's Pregnancy and Parental Leave Act

The New York law, signed April 4, 2016, will provide employees with up to 12 weeks paid leave to bond with a child, care for an ill family member or address issues while a family member is on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces. When the law becomes effective January 1, 2018, employees will be eligible for up to eight weeks of paid leave at a weekly benefit amount of 50 percent of the employee’s average weekly wage. When fully implemented in January 2021, the policy will cover 67 percent of an employee’s average wages up to 12 weeks.

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